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Saturday, August 15, 2020 | History

6 edition of Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war found in the catalog.

Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war

Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war

selections from the holdings of the Lyndon B. Johnson Library

  • 194 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by University Publications of America in Frederick, MD .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Lyndon Baines Johnson Library -- Archives,
    • Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975 -- Public opinion -- Sources,
    • Public opinion -- United States -- History -- Sources,
    • Mass media -- United States -- History -- Sources,
    • Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975 -- United States -- Sources,
    • United States -- History -- 1961-1969 -- Sources

    • Edition Notes

      Accompanied by a printed reel guide.

      Statementedited by Robert E. Lester.
      SeriesThe Presidential documents series
      ContributionsLester, Robert., Lyndon Baines Johnson Library., University Publications of America, Inc.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS559.62, Microfilm 21,280
      The Physical Object
      FormatMicroform
      Pagination11 microfilm reels
      Number of Pages11
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2377835M
      ISBN 100890934967
      LC Control Number87006248

        Recent polls show that the public strongly approves of President George W. Bush's call to arms, with levels of support that rival Americans' response to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. A review of Gallup polls during other wars shows that support for military action can vary substantially from one war to the next. In the cases of Korea and Vietnam, initial supportive responses eventually. The Vietnam War (Vietnamese: Chiến tranh Việt Nam), also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America (Vietnamese: Kháng chiến chống Mỹ) or simply the American War, was a conflict in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November to the fall of Saigon on 30 April It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought Location: South Vietnam, North Vietnam, .

      The libraries, selected through a peer-reviewed competitive application process, will receive a copy of the hour documentary series on DVD, with public performance rights, as well as the companion book, “The Vietnam War: An Intimate History” by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns (Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Penguin Random House, ).   General Vo Nguyen Giap: Vietnam War Was Lost at Home-Incorrect Attribution!General Vo Nguyen Giap, commander of the North Vietnamese Army, wrote in his memoirs that his army was on the brink of collapse, but the U.S. lost the Vietnam War at home because of the media and protestors.

      Filed under: Vietnam War, -- Engineering and construction Base Development in South Vietnam, (), by Carroll H. Dunn (PDF at US Army CMH) U.S. Army Engineers, (Washington: Department of the Army, ), by Robert R. Ploger (PDF at US Army CMH). book, Vietnam at War, that the "constant force of destruction, suffering, and blood brought into American living rooms horrified and dismayed the Amer-ican people." Recoiling, so the theory goes, the American public abandoned South Vietnam to its enemies.' A former American diplomat, Martin F. Herz, in The Vietnam War in Ret-.


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Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Vietnam War was the second-longest war in United States history, after the war in Afghanistan. Promises and commitments to the people and government of South Vietnam to keep communist forces from overtaking them reached back into the Truman Administration.

Eisenhower placed military advisers and CIA operatives in Vietnam, and John F. The role of the media in the Vietnam War is a subject of continuing controversy. Some believe that the media played a large role in the U.S. defeat. They argue that the media’s tendency toward negative reporting helped to undermine support for the war in the United States while its uncensored coverage provided valuable information to the.

William Hammond's book Reporting Vietnam is a "description of official efforts to manage the U.S. government's relations with the news media during the war." It is also "a synthesis and refinement" of two volumes on the subject previously published by the author, and totaling more than one thousand by:   Americans have become negative about the war in Iraq more quickly than they did for the Vietnam War.

It took more than three years before a majority of Americans said it was a mistake to send troops to Vietnam, a state of affairs reached within a year and three months of the inception of the Iraq war.

However, the percentage of Americans mentioning Iraq as the nation's most important problem. The high costs of the military's misguided approach in American and Vietnamese lives sapped the support of the American people for the U.S. commitment to Indochina. Even worse, the costs of the war undermined American public support for the Cold War on all fronts/5(62).

Get this from a library. Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war: selections from the holdings of the Lyndon B. Johnson Library. [Robert Lester; Lyndon Baines Johnson Library.; University Publications of America, Inc.;]. Lists and indexes set of 11 microfilm reels with title: Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war.

Description: ix, 22 pages ; 22 cm. Series Title: Presidential documents series. Other Titles: Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war: Responsibility: edited by Robert E. Lester.

The role of the media in the perception of the Vietnam War has been widely noted. Intense levels of graphic news coverage correlated with dramatic shifts of public opinion regarding the conflict, and there is controversy over what effect journalism had on support or opposition to the war, as well as the decisions that policymakers made in response.

Vietnam was America's most divisive and unsuccessful foreign war. It was also the first to be televised and the first of the modern era fought without military censorship.

From the earliest days of the Kennedy-Johnson escalation right up to the American withdrawal, and even today, the media's role in Vietnam has continued to be intensely controversial.5/5(1). The Vietnam war is often referred to as the “first television war.” Media coverage showed the American public the reality of a foreign war, detached from the government’s optimistic.

the issue of Vietnam, the media, and public support for the war. These files include polls, correspondence, reports, and speeches by the White House and various executive departments, congressional correspondence and committee reports, and correspondence, memoranda, and reports from pri-vate individuals and Size: KB.

Summarizing mostly from Pilger again, the political background to the buildup of the Vietnam war is worth highlighting here: Having declared a policy of containing communism in Asia, the American government in gave $10 million to assist the French in winning back their colony in the North.

Within four years the Americans were paying 78 percent of a colonial war directed by the same. When the United States first sent their troops to Vietnam on March 8,many Americans supported that military effort. 61 percent of Americans said no when asked if the U.S.

military intervention in Vietnam was a mistake. However, as the war dragged on, the public support began to drop while the number of skepticism Continue reading Credibility Gap →. The term “Agent Orange” has been in and out of news media since the s. War Crimes in Vietnam. In the wake of the public realization of the My Lai Massacre, there were several movements which attempted to bring to light the number of war crimes that were being perpetrated in Vietnam.

General Articles. Military Operations. them. To Johnson, releasing scenes from the Vietnam War to the American public made victory impossible.

In SeptemberAmerican public war support dropped to its lowest, an abysmal 19 percent, and this was due in large part to journalism’s role in the war.

Without a doubt, the stateAuthor: Kyle Hadyniak. Buy The "Uncensored War": The Media and Vietnam First Edition by Hallin, Daniel C. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(5). UntilWalter Cronkite believed what his government told him about the Vietnam War.

He was an old-school journalist, a patriot, a man who came of. The Hawks claimed that the one-sided criticism of the media contributed to the decline of public support for the war and ultimately helped the U.S.

lose the war. Author William F. Buckley repeatedly wrote about his approval for the war and suggested that "The United States has been timid, if not cowardly, in refusing to seek 'victory' in Vietnam."Caused by: United States Involvement in the Vietnam War.

the media and war, reviewed by Sasha Jesperson. The Media at War: Communication and Conflict in the Twentieth Century. 2nd Edition. Susan Carruthers. Palgrave. February Find this book: Google Books Amazon LSE Library Carruthers’ second edition of The Media at War comes at an interesting time as the UK grapples with the relationship File Size: 51KB.

In the vast literature on the Vietnam War, much has been written about the antiwar movement and its influence on U.S. policy and politics.

In this book, Sandra Scanlon shifts attention to those Americans who supported the war and explores the war’s impact on the burgeoning conservative political movement of the s and early s. media did, of course, criticize the war, and helped shape the debate over the war's direction.

And Vietnam was covered differently than other wars. But the mainstream press never stood outside the dominant culture to criticize it. Instead, it reflected societal shifts in the boundaries between consensus, legitimate controversy, and : Delli Carpini, Michael X.Up until this time, the war had strong support from the media, the public, and Congress.

The military continuously reported that the U.S was making encouraging progress. Gradually, however, support for the war began to decrease. Harry Rothmann Bruce Katz,yes I was an infantry unit leaders there to Please see my review of the book.

I have also just written a book on the war and more Bruce Katz,yes I was an infantry unit leaders there to Please see my review of the book. I have also just written a book on the war and you can see it on my page or on Amazon or Apple/5().